Are vinyls doomed for the advent of the music tape/cassette?


cassettes

Sind Leer-Cassetten der Tod der Schallplatte?.

Interesting flashback to the mid 70ies when music cassettes and portable player devices became popular. Even then the music industry’s sole response was to complain about the loss in revenue. You could say that P2P filesharing is the digital equivalent of the music cassette back in the day. Following this reasoning – the more pirating, the better for the artists in the long run. No?

Wesbound on JazzNet 247 with Wes George Gillespie


wesbound press photoI am stoked!!!! Recently, Wes Gillespie of Smooth Jazz Radio Station JazzNet 247 selected my tracks I Count on U and Naiad Theme for his fine programming. This in itsself would be an incredible treat alone, but it gets even better: I recently checked his playlist and was almost falling from my chair from detecting myself among all the BIG names of the genre! Upon tuning in to his radio show, I hear a radio jingle with announcements of the songs to air during the second hour of his show and – shock again! – he placed an announcement of my track between Brian Culbertson and – Herbie Hancock!! I mean – come on!!! This is getting better than whatever dreams I may have had in my late teens and early twens! A-M-A-Z-I-N-G!!!

Some of my Facebook family and friends might be tempted to think, I was presenting myself extra-humble in order to “solicit” more attention or support, but no! Take my word on this: I am really, really almost in disbelief over all the incredible things that have started to happen for me!! And excited and thrilled at the same time, of course!

Again, my heartfelt gratitude to all of you, who have and are supporting me in ways I could not have imagined! This is major, major, major and means EVERYTHING to me! And know that I keep working on my chops and material. After all – what could be better than knowing there is an appreciating audience waiting for more to come?

Thank you all! At this point, I’d like to mention Brian O’Neal, who got the ball rolling for me about one and a half years ago, by inviting me to collaborate on his track and then video Dreams in Color and by getting the word out. Please consider supporting his charity organization DO Foundation that came from this musical collaboration. Also, a big shoutout to April Sims and Christopher Fields on WAGTi Radio, for inviting me to be among the first interview guests when the station launched under that name in March 2009. After that, I soon found myself invited on a couple more stations getting interested in airing my music and finding out about my work. Cres O’Neal, Gary Fuston, Mary Ann of U S Smooth Jazz Network, Marissa Caliguire to name a few more – thank you dearly! Please find the complete list of stations and radio presenters here.

This is incredibly exciting, people! Thank you!
Peace,

wesbound, October 2010

My best ranking on Reverbnation so far


wesbound ranking on Reverbnation todayWow – this is a first: I rank at #1 on Reverbnation locally (that’d be for Munich and Greater Munich area, #9 for Germany, #582 globally and still #21861 amongst all RN users – which total at 425,000. Champagne, cocktails, dancers? No: A LIVE band! :D

A little insight into the recording process


OK, so now there’s 36 bars of a guitar track for my next track in the making. This equals about half a day’s work. Why that much? And why was I being slow? Can’t I play at all? Let me explain:
I left it the way it is now at about the 30th take into it. When I say “take”, I mean to say one ENTIRE track of recorded guitar, from bar 12 through 38. Don’t get me wrong: I had a decent take on the first attempt, yes. But then: It was only decent. I don’t by any means claim that the current track is perfect or anointed or anything. But it’s the least quality I’m satisfied with. So now why does it take so long?
Ok: I found out that I sound more organic when doing “entire tracks of takes” – in this case: About 36 bars at ONE GO! That again means, if I mess up anywhere in between … – you guessed it! – I stop the recording, go right back to the top of the track and start all over. Most often, I delete the current take right away unless I feel there were some parts I might be using later (which I rarely do, given the approach of taking the entire track in one go). To give you an example: Let’s say, a string accidentally snaps or “tingles” (in not a musical way) on the neckboard at bar 37… YES! I go RIGHT BACK TO THE VERY TOP and start all over!!! And I keep doing that as many times as it takes for me to be “OK” with the recording. When I say OK I don’t mean to be fishing for compliments, either. It’s really just that: When I’m ok with it, that’s when I leave it as is and move on. No sooner than that. If that requires for me to come back for an entire week until I got it right – I will! If it means, I have to drop some heavier parts and play something simpler, I will. If it means I’ll drop the take altogether… I will. The bottomline: Only – when I can lean back and listen without getting a knot in my stomach, only THEN will I warm up to the thought of actually “freezing” the take and move on to the next one.
For the songs I’ve put out so far, there’s typically between 20 and 30 individual tracks. Not all of them are single instruments. Sometimes, there’s a track with only fill-ins on drums. Other times, there are some ad libs (“random” additions) on the instrument. Sometimes, it’s a midi-track I’ve already recorded, which I copy and assign a new sound to (to “fatten” it, mostly for bass sounds, sometimes for bass drum or snares). This is just about the “raw” process of tracking instruments. The editing process… guess, that will be a different chapter.
OK, now I’m gonna take a break and do a lap of bike-riding or swimming, then back to the “sweatshop” later LOL.

Have a great day, everyone!
Peace,
wesbound